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Welcome to the Community!

All Ages

Safe & Civil Schools

Social and Emotional Health

Special Education

This workshop is designed to help neuro-diverse learners foster imagination, creativity, togetherness, collaboration, and conflict resolution skills.

10
avatar Submitted By: Daniel Kwan

May 14, 2020

Download Assets

Skills

  • Citizenship
  • Collaboration
  • Communication

External References

Technology Integration and Learning Theory

Aldoobie, N. (2015). International Journal of Contemporary Research, 5, 114-118.

Scaffolding and Achievement in Problem-Based and Inquiry Learning: A Response to Kirschner, Sweller

Hmelo-Silver, C. E., Duncan, R. G. & Chinn, C. A. (2007). Educational Psychologist, 42(2), 99-107. doi:10.1080/00461520701263368

Teaching Technology Integration to K-12 Educators: A ‘Gamified’ Approach

Kopcha, T. J., Ding, L., Neumann, K. L., & Choi, I. (2016). TechTrends, 60(1), 62-69. doi:10.1007/s11528-015-

Game-Based Learning

Tobias, S., Fletcher, J. D., & Wind, A. P. (2013). Handbook of Research on Educational Communications and Technology, 485-503. doi:10.1007/978-1-461

Supporting Files

The Community (World File)


Attached world file for The Community designed by Daniel Kwan.

Learning Objectives

  • The objective of this free form workshop is to help participants build valuable social and emotional skills by regulating negative emotions, sharing, and supporting others through a shared Minecraft: Education Edition experience. The included Minecraft: Education Edition world serves as a digital playground for participants to practice the following basic skills: playing with others, talking to others, managing emotions, and solving problems.

Guiding Ideas

Guiding Ideas:

  • Providing a social experience with meaningful interaction
  • Developing a sense of community and inclusion within and beyond a digital play space

Questions:

  • How can we manage and minimize our negative impact on others in a shared digital AND physical environment?
  • How can I share my Minecraft knowledge and ideas without disrupting their in-game experience?
  • How can we use local, multiplayer games to foster real-world friendships and community?

Student Activities

While working in pairs or alone, students will spend two hours creating their own unique homes in a shared Minecraft: Education Edition community world. The workshop and the world were developed by Daniel Kwan at the Microsoft Store at Yorkdale Shopping Centre in Toronto, Ontario, Canada with the support of Jake’s House - a non-profit that provides practical help and lasting hope to families living with autism. Designed for neurotypical and neuro-diverse learners, this workshop is designed to help foster imagination, creativity, togetherness, collaboration, and conflict resolution skills. In collaboration with Blaise Patterson at the Microsoft Store at Square One Shopping Centre, peer-reviewed research articles were included to support the performance expectations.

The attached world file is designed to accommodate up to 36 individual users and a facilitator who will all work collaboratively towards a shared goal: building a shared community! All the roads, sidewalks, lighting fixtures, and fences that separate each building lot are immutable and can only be modified by a facilitator with Operator status. Each student is assigned Member status when they enter the world and will be capable of building on any plot of land. Border blocks have been used to keep everyone within the neighbourhood.

 

 

At the start of the workshop, everyone who joins the server will be greeted by an NPC that will prompt them to read the community guidelines. Then, the participant will be allowed to select a building lot within the world. The facilitator will write each participant's name in the slate associated with their lot. After this, everyone can start building!

 

 

During the session, encourage each participant to explore the neighbourhood during the building process, interacting with others as they explore the different houses being built. In order to maintain a positive social environment, it is important that each participant reads and acknowledges the guidelines presented on the board. Students can make use of Immersive Reader by clicking on the dialogue button after interacting with "Daniel" the NPC, or by pressing "i" when they're looking at the "Community Guidelines" board. These rules are very important for the overall success of this workshop, as they outline acceptable behaviour and serve as something to refer to during the workshop.

Performance Expectations

Constructivism. Real learning occurs when it is learner-centered; through mistakes and self-inquiry, learners make meaning by connecting new content to existing knowledge (Aldoobie, 2015). Using MinecraftEdu helps the user control their learning environment through an engaging medium. It also allows the users to reference their existing knowledge of Minecraft and build on it by developing their community world.

Problem-Based Learning. By creating a clear picture of a variety of problems and misinformation, we can grow our personal lenses of what is ‘right or wrong’. Problem-based learning is done through collaboration and requires ongoing dialogue to really unfold what is being discussed and how a solution can be formed (Hmelo-Silver et al., 2007). Users must problem-solve independently and with their peers, in order to understand controls, and build processes.

21st Century Skills. If we hope to prepare today’s learners for the changing world, we must incorporate meaningful learning opportunities. Digital manipulatives and technological learning tools will help prepare students for digital career opportunities (Kopcha et al., 2016).

Collaboration. It is important to promote collaboration and presentations using classroom learning technologies, it empowers students, creates confidence and develops leadership with these tools (Tobias et al., 2013).

Skills

  • Citizenship
  • Collaboration
  • Communication

External References

Technology Integration and Learning Theory

Aldoobie, N. (2015). International Journal of Contemporary Research, 5, 114-118.

Scaffolding and Achievement in Problem-Based and Inquiry Learning: A Response to Kirschner, Sweller

Hmelo-Silver, C. E., Duncan, R. G. & Chinn, C. A. (2007). Educational Psychologist, 42(2), 99-107. doi:10.1080/00461520701263368

Teaching Technology Integration to K-12 Educators: A ‘Gamified’ Approach

Kopcha, T. J., Ding, L., Neumann, K. L., & Choi, I. (2016). TechTrends, 60(1), 62-69. doi:10.1007/s11528-015-

Game-Based Learning

Tobias, S., Fletcher, J. D., & Wind, A. P. (2013). Handbook of Research on Educational Communications and Technology, 485-503. doi:10.1007/978-1-461

Supporting Files

The Community (World File)


Attached world file for The Community designed by Daniel Kwan.