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Museum of the Future

6-7 yrs old

8-10 yrs old

11-13 yrs old

14-18 yrs old

18+ yrs old

Art and Design

Technology

In the future, there may be flying cars and teleporters...who knows? Students create a museum that reflects their vision of the future.

avatar Submitted By: Ben Spieldenner

October 13, 2017

Skills

  • Creativity
  • Critical Thinking
  • Project Based Learning

External References

The Smithsonian

An excellent place to get ideas and inspiration for displays.

Supporting Files

Museum of the Future


A Minecraft:Education Edition world

Learning Objectives

  • Students will predict future technologies based on current technologies.
  • Students will predict trends in art/design.
  • Students will organize spatial concepts.

Guiding Ideas

In the novel The Time Machine, HG Wells reveals his predictions of the future.  He even includes a museum of the future that houses artifacts spanning over 800,000 years.  What might a museum of the future look like?  What kinds of things will important to future generations?  What events might be memorialized?  Students will explore these questions as they create their own museum of the future.

Student Activities

  1. Students will spawn directly in front of the sign indicating the task: to create a museum that is at least 1,000 years in the future.
    • Note: The sign can be changed to best fit your directions or project needs.
  2. Students need to brainstorm ways they see the world changing in the future.
  3. Have them pick 10 different displays that best fit the ways they see the world changing.
    • These displays should focus on things important to each student.
      • For example, sports, transportation, etc.
  4. Students should then choose one of the areas designated for museums (22 areas have been designated).  These are outlined with "deny" blocks.
    • Students will have limited width and depth, but virtually unlimited height for their museum.
    • The idea is to have all of your students create a museum in the same world, so students can visit each other's museum easily.
  5. You should reinforce the importance of design in the museum building itself, not just the display.
    • You may have students that have ideas that are quite complicated.  Allowing students to create pixel art to represent things might help. (For example, a cell phone might best be represented as a tall sculpture made of multiple bricks.)
  6. Have students build their museum around their 10 displays.
  7. Once students are finished with their museum, you could:
    • Have a virtual walkthrough
    • Have students critique each other's museums
    • Share with parents

Performance Expectations

Students should be able to organize their predictions of the future into categories and create displays under each of these categories.  Descriptions of each display, using signs, is crucial to understanding the overall categories and underlying ideas behind each display.  Also, the ability for students to explore their peers' ideas in an immersive environment can be an effective way to give direct instruction on critiquing another student's work.

Skills

  • Creativity
  • Critical Thinking
  • Project Based Learning

External References

The Smithsonian

An excellent place to get ideas and inspiration for displays.

Supporting Files

Museum of the Future


A Minecraft:Education Edition world